Is there a list of Civil War hospitals in Nashville?

Here is a list of Civil War hospitals in Nashville:

  1. Cumberland Hospital (Volunteers)
    900 beds and was led by B.Cloak.
  2. U.S. General No. 1 (Volunteers)
    936 beds, led by B.B. Breed.
  3. U.S. General No. 2 (Volunteers)
    886 beds, led by J.E. Herbst.
  4. U.S. General No. 3 (Volunteers)
    600 beds, led by J.R. Ludlow.
  5. U.S. General No. 8 (U.S. Army)
    540 beds, led by C.C. Byrne.
  6. U.S. General No. 11 (U.S. Army)
    720 beds, led by G.W. France.
  7. U.S. General No. 14 (Volunteers)
    775 beds, led by S.E. Fuller.
  8. U.S. General No. 15 (U.S. Army)
    400 beds, led by J.J. O’Reilly.
  9. U.S. General No. 16 (U.S. Army)
    289 beds, led by J.S. Giltner.
    [See pic of hospital]
  10. U.S. General No. 17 (Volunteers)
    120 beds, led by J.E. Herbst.
  11. U.S. General No. 19 (Volunteers)
    629 beds, led by W.H. Thorne.
  12. Hospital for Federal officers [Picture]
    (Literary Department, University of Nashville; later Lindsley Hall, Peabody Normal College)]

 

The Battle of New Market took place in 1864, on this day in history

Battle summary below provided by the Civil War Trust | Read more on their site

“In conjunction with other spring 1864 offensives against strategic points in the Confederacy, Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant ordered Maj. Gen. Franz Sigel to move up the Shenandoah Valley along the Valley Turnpike to destroy the railroad and canal complex at Lynchburg. Union control of the strategic and agriculturally rich valley was a crucial part of Grant’s plans. Receiving word that the Union Army had entered the valley, Maj. Gen. John C. Breckinridge pulled together all available troops to repulse the invaders and gathered his forces near Staunton. Breckenridge decided to take the offensive and attack Sigel, and moved his army north towards New Market. The morning of May 15th, Breckenridge’s men met Sigel’s army just north of the town. At a crucial point, a key Union battery was withdrawn from the line to replenish its ammunition, leaving a weakness that Breckinridge was quick to exploit. He ordered his entire force forward, including many young cadets from the Virginia Military Institute, and Sigel’s stubborn defense collapsed. Threatened by the Confederate cavalry on his left flank and rear, Sigel ordered a withdrawal, burning the bridge over the North Fork of the Shenandoah River behind him.  Sigel retreated to Strasburg and was soon replaced by Maj. Gen. David Hunter.”

Click here to peruse a photo gallery of pictures of New Market on Flickr.

German immigrant joins 183rd Ohio and faces the elephant at Franklin and Nashville

George Schuch of the 183rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry Co E was at Franklin.

George Schuch(k) Spelled Schuck in most records Schuch on his gravestone and his family went by Schuch.

10th OVI I Co Sgt transfered to 10th OVI D Co as a Pvt Enlisted in 174th OVI then the unit was combined with 183rd OVI E Co First Sgt then reduced to Sgt after one month.

George Schuch was born in Germany in 1827. Moved to Cincinnati, Oh. Enlisted in the 10th OVI (3 month)  June 1861 and then 10th OVI ( 3 year) Fought in W. Va and then returned to Cincinnati in Dec 1861 Went AWOL and was later Declared a deserter. He returned to the Unit in May 1863 and forfeited all pay and allowances. He fought in the Tennessee campaign.

May 1864 Placed in stockade awaiting General Court Martial by his Commander. Charges unknown. He was acquitted of the charges but the stockade did not get the paperwork and he was held in jail for six weeks until he wrote the Judge Advocate asking to be told why he was being held. The Captain found he was acquitted and ordered his release to be sent home to be Mustered out as his enlistment had expired.

He enlisted again in the 174th OVI in Sept 1864 the 174th was combined into the 183rd OVI in Oct 1864 and he was appointed First Sergeant then one month later he was replaced as First Sergeant and reduced to Sergeant. He fought in the Spring Valley-Franklin-Nashville battles and later joined Sherman in the Carolina’s till the end of the war. He Mustered out in July 1865.

He returned to Cincinnati, Oh . He was admitted into the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers in Dayton Ohio in 1880 and received a pension of $10 a month in 1897 later increased to $12 a month for rheumatism and heart problems. He died in the National Home and was buried in the Military Cemetery at the home in Dayton Ohio.

Submitted by Keith Schuch
grunt087@yahoo.com

Gen J.E.B. Stuart dies from his mortal wounds at Yellow Tavern, on May 12, 1864

“The Battle of Yellow Tavern was fought on May 11, 1864, at a vital crossroads in Henrico County, only six miles north of the Confederate capital of Richmond during the American Civil War (1861–1865). Part of Union general-in-chief Ulysses S. Grant’s Overland Campaign in the spring of 1864, the cavalry battle resulted from Philip H. Sheridan’s quest to track down the famous Confederate trooper J. E. B. Stuart and “whip” him. Stuart, like Robert E. Lee, preferred to be on the offensive and immediately set out after Sheridan, but by the time he caught up with him at an inn called Yellow Tavern, his outnumbered force was hard-ridden and tired. The Confederate cavalry fought hard for a full day, and as Stuart rode up and down the front lines in the driving rain to rally his men, a Michigan sharpshooter shot the general in the side. Fitzhugh Lee then took command, but was forced to withdraw. Stuart died the next day . . .”

Text excerpted above and full article from The Encyclopedia of Virginia

See this article by The Civil War Trust too.

Yellow Tavern Illustration

An artist’s rendering of the Battle of Yellow Tavern depicts the opposing forces engaged on horseback. While much of the fighting along the Telegraph Road between Lomax and Merritt was dismounted, the climax of the battle prior to Stuart’s wounding was characterized by mounted charges and counter-charges.

Rare Harriet Tubman photo acquired by Library of Congress and NMAAH

Guest blogpost: Ron Coddington | Publisher of Military Images Magazine

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BREAKING NEWS: RARE HARRIET TUBMAN PHOTO ACQUIRED BY LOC AND NMAAH.—The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture and the Library of Congress today announced the joint acquisition of an album of 44 rare photographs, including a previously unrecorded portrait of abolitionist and Underground Railroad conductor Harriet Tubman and the only known photograph of John Willis Menard, the first African American man elected to the U.S. Congress.

The collaboration ensures these pieces of American history will be accessible to the public in perpetuity.

“It is a distinct honor to have these photographs that tell an important part of America’s history,” said Lonnie Bunch, founding director of the National Museum of African American History and Culture. “We are pleased and humbled to work with the Library of Congress to ensure that this rare and significant collection will be preserved and made accessible to the American public.”

“To have a new glimpse of such key figures in American history is rare indeed,” said Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. “Through this extraordinary collaboration, these images will be forever part of our shared heritage and will be a source of inspiration for many generations to come.”

The images are part of the photo album of Emily Howland (1827–1929), a Quaker school teacher who taught at Camp Todd, the Freedman’s School in Arlington, Va. The album contains 44 images taken circa 1860s, including the Tubman and Menard images, as well as a print of a more commonly known Tubman portrait taken later in life, and images of Charles Sumner, Lydia Maria Child, Samuel Ely, William Ellery Channing, Colonel C.W. Folsom and Charles Dickens.

About the National Museum of African American History and Culture
The National Museum of African American History and Culture opened Sept. 24 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Occupying a prominent location next to the Washington Monument, the nearly 400,000-square-foot museum is the nation’s largest and most comprehensive cultural destination devoted exclusively to exploring, documenting and showcasing the African American story and its impact on American and world history. For more information about the museum, visit nmaahc.si.edu or call Smithsonian information at (202) 633-1000.

About the Library of Congress
The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

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