Abraham Lincoln (aka Dennis Boggs) recites his April 1863 Day of Prayer proclamation

[YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MfpBJE6bNNs]

President Abraham Lincoln’s Proclamation:

A Day Of National Humiliation, Fasting, and Prayer
in the The United States Of America on April 30, 1863

WHEREAS, the senate of the United States, devoutly recognizing the Supreme Authority and Just Government of Almighty God, in all the affairs of men and of nations, has by a resolution, required the President to designate and set apart a day for National prayer and humiliation:

And whereas, it is the duty of nations as as well as of men, to owe their dependence upon the overruling power of God, to confess their sins and transgressions, in humble sorrow, yet with assured hope that genuine repentance will lead to mercy and pardon; and to recognize the sublime truth, announced in the Holy Scriptures and proven by all history, that those nations only are blessed whose God is the Lord:

And, in so much as we know that, by His divine law, nations, like individuals, are subjected to punishments and chastisements in this world, may we not justly fear that the awful calamity of civil war, which now desolates the land, may be but a punishment inflicted upon us for our presumptuous sins, to the needful end of our national reformation as a whole People? We have been the recipients of the choicest bounties of Heaven. We have been preserved, these many years, in peace and prosperity. We have grown in numbers, wealth, and power as no other nation has ever grown. But we have forgotten God. We have forgotten the gracious hand which preserved us in peace, and multiplied and enriched and strengthened us; and we have vainly imagined, in the deceitfulness of our hearts, that all these blessings were produced by some superior wisdom and virtue of our own. Intoxicated with unbroken success, we have become too self-sufficient to feel the necessity of redeeming and preserving grace, too proud to pray to the God that made us! It behooves us, then to humble ourselves before the offended Power, to confess our national sins, and to pray for clemency and forgiveness.

Now, therefore, in compliance with the request , and fully concurring in the views of the Senate, I do, by this proclamation, designate and set apart Thursday, the 30th day of April, 1863, as a day of national humiliation, fasting, and prayer. And I do hereby request all the People to abstain on that day from their ordinary secular pursuits, and to unite, at their several places of public worship and their respective homes, in keeping the day holy to the Lord, and devoted to the humble discharge of the religious duties proper to that solemn occasion.

All this being done, in sincerity and truth, let us then rest humbly in the hope authorized by the Divine teachings, that the united cry of the Nation will be heard on high, and answered with blessings, no less than the pardon of our national sins, and the restoration of our now divided and suffering country, to its former happy condition of unity and peace.

In witness whereof, I have here unto set my hand, and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington this thirtieth day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-seventy.

By the President:
ABRAHAM LINCOLN

William H. Seward, Secretary of State

Abraham Lincoln recites the Gettysburg Address

Lincoln reenactor – Dennis Boggs – recently spoke at marker dedication ceremony for a Union soldier. He gave a few appropriate remarks and then recited the famous Gettysburg Address. The location was the Mount Olivet Cemetery in Nashville, Tennessee.

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Four score and seven years ago, our fathers brought forth upon this continent a new nation: conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war. . .testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated. . . can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war.

We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate. . .we cannot consecrate. . . we cannot hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember, what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.

It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us. . .that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion. . . that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain. . . that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom. . . and that government of the people. . .by the people. . .for the people. . . shall not perish from the earth.

Honoring the Confederate dead in McGavock Confederate Cemetery

One of my favorite places in Williamson County, where I live, is the Carnton Historic Plantation. On this property is the McGavock Confederate Cemetery. I’m not one of those ‘the South must rise again’ kinda people but I do have a profound appreciation for the sacrifice, courage and honor displayed by the brave Confederate soldiers.

On November 30, 1864, the Northern and Southern armies clashed in front of Carter’s farm just south of downtown Franklin. In five hours, more men fell as casualties from this bloody fight than the U.S. soldiers who fell during the invasion of Normandy.

The Battle of Franklin saw 10,000 casualties in just five hours. The Confederates lost at least 2,000 men. Nearly 1,500 Confederate soldiers were buried in McGavock Cemetery in Franklin, TN. I made this video to honor these Southern souls.

Franklin, Tennessee community commemorates the 144th anniversary of the Battle of Franklin

A good size crowd of Williamson County residents showed up at the Carter House location near downtown Franklin tonight (11.30) to commemorate the 144th anniversary of the Battle of Franklin.  There were 10,000 luminaries (white bags with a lighted candle) to symbolize the 10,000 casualties from the battle that took place 30 November 1864.

Historian and author Erik A. Jacobson spoke for about ten minutes.

Part One

Part two

The Civil War bands played the Star Spangled Banner

Here are some pictures of the event.

PB300025.JPG by you.

PB300028.JPG by you.

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Historian Jacobson talks about Battle of Franklin action that took place on the site of recent land acquisition

Eric A. Jacobson, Carnton historian, and author of the best-selling For Cause and for Country, spoke on Friday, June 19th, 2008, at the Franklin’s Charge press conference. He gave great detail on the action between the Federal and Rebel soldiers on the very site of the property that was just purchased by Franklin’s Charge. It is believed that the epicenter of the Battle of Franklin took place precisely on this spot.